Hướng dẫn python ansi to utf-8


I have around 600,000 files encoded in ANSI and I want to convert them to UTF-8. I can do that individually in NOTEPAD++, but i can't do that for 600,000 files.Can i do this in R or Python?

I have found this link but the Python script is not running: notepad++ converting ansi encoded file to utf-8

asked Jul 17, 2015 at 8:05

Hướng dẫn python ansi to utf-8

6

Why don't you read the file and write it as UTF-8? You can do that in Python.

#to support encodings
import codecs

#read input file
with codecs.open(path, 'r', encoding = 'utf8') as file:
  lines = file.read()

#write output file
with codecs.open(path, 'w', encoding = 'utf8') as file:
  file.write(lines)

answered Jul 17, 2015 at 8:13

3Ducker3Ducker

3231 silver badge9 bronze badges

3

I appreciate that this is an old question but having just resolved a similar problem recently I thought I would share my solution.

I had a file being prepared by one program that I needed to import in to an sqlite3 database but the text file was always 'ANSI' and sqlite3 requires UTF-8.

The ANSI encoding is recognised as 'mbcs' in python and therefore the code I have used, ripping off something else I found is:

blockSize = 1048576
with codecs.open("your ANSI source file.txt","r",encoding="mbcs") as sourceFile:
    with codecs.open("Your UTF-8 output file.txt","w",encoding="UTF-8") as targetFile:
        while True:
            contents = sourceFile.read(blockSize)
            if not contents:
                break
            targetFile.write(contents)

The below link contains some information on the encoding types that I found on my research

https://docs.python.org/2.4/lib/standard-encodings.html

answered Dec 19, 2018 at 17:27

MS Notepad gives the user a choice of 4 encodings, expressed in clumsy confusing terminology:

"Unicode" is UTF-16, written little-endian. "Unicode big endian" is UTF-16, written big-endian. In both UTF-16 cases, this means that the appropriate BOM will be written. Use utf-16 to decode such a file.

"UTF-8" is UTF-8; Notepad explicitly writes a "UTF-8 BOM". Use utf-8-sig to decode such a file.

"ANSI" is a shocker. This is MS terminology for "whatever the default legacy encoding is on this computer".

Here is a list of Windows encodings that I know of and the languages/scripts that they are used for:

cp874  Thai
cp932  Japanese 
cp936  Unified Chinese (P.R. China, Singapore)
cp949  Korean 
cp950  Traditional Chinese (Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macao(?))
cp1250 Central and Eastern Europe 
cp1251 Cyrillic ( Belarusian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Serbian, Ukrainian)
cp1252 Western European languages
cp1253 Greek 
cp1254 Turkish 
cp1255 Hebrew 
cp1256 Arabic script
cp1257 Baltic languages 
cp1258 Vietnamese
cp???? languages/scripts of India  

If the file has been created on the computer where it is being read, then you can obtain the "ANSI" encoding by locale.getpreferredencoding(). Otherwise if you know where it came from, you can specify what encoding to use if it's not UTF-16. Failing that, guess.

Be careful using codecs.open() to read files on Windows. The docs say: """Note Files are always opened in binary mode, even if no binary mode was specified. This is done to avoid data loss due to encodings using 8-bit values. This means that no automatic conversion of '\n' is done on reading and writing.""" This means that your lines will end in \r\n and you will need/want to strip those off.

Putting it all together:

Sample text file, saved with all 4 encoding choices, looks like this in Notepad:

The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs.
àáâãäå

Here is some demo code:

import locale

def guess_notepad_encoding(filepath, default_ansi_encoding=None):
    with open(filepath, 'rb') as f:
        data = f.read(3)
    if data[:2] in ('\xff\xfe', '\xfe\xff'):
        return 'utf-16'
    if data == u''.encode('utf-8-sig'):
        return 'utf-8-sig'
    # presumably "ANSI"
    return default_ansi_encoding or locale.getpreferredencoding()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    import sys, glob, codecs
    defenc = sys.argv[1]
    for fpath in glob.glob(sys.argv[2]):
        print
        print (fpath, defenc)
        with open(fpath, 'rb') as f:
            print "raw:", repr(f.read())
        enc = guess_notepad_encoding(fpath, defenc)
        print "guessed encoding:", enc
        with codecs.open(fpath, 'r', enc) as f:
            for lino, line in enumerate(f, 1):
                print lino, repr(line)
                print lino, repr(line.rstrip('\r\n'))

and here is the output when run in a Windows "Command Prompt" window using the command \python27\python read_notepad.py "" t1-*.txt

('t1-ansi.txt', '')
raw: 'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs.\r\n\xe0\xe1\xe2\xe3\xe4\xe5
\r\n'
guessed encoding: cp1252
1 u'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs.\r\n'
1 u'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs.'
2 u'\xe0\xe1\xe2\xe3\xe4\xe5\r\n'
2 u'\xe0\xe1\xe2\xe3\xe4\xe5'

('t1-u8.txt', '')
raw: '\xef\xbb\xbfThe quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs.\r\n\xc3\xa0\xc3
\xa1\xc3\xa2\xc3\xa3\xc3\xa4\xc3\xa5\r\n'
guessed encoding: utf-8-sig
1 u'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs.\r\n'
1 u'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs.'
2 u'\xe0\xe1\xe2\xe3\xe4\xe5\r\n'
2 u'\xe0\xe1\xe2\xe3\xe4\xe5'

('t1-uc.txt', '')
raw: '\xff\xfeT\x00h\x00e\x00 \x00q\x00u\x00i\x00c\x00k\x00 \x00b\x00r\x00o\x00w
\x00n\x00 \x00f\x00o\x00x\x00 \x00j\x00u\x00m\x00p\x00e\x00d\x00 \x00o\x00v\x00e
\x00r\x00 \x00t\x00h\x00e\x00 \x00l\x00a\x00z\x00y\x00 \x00d\x00o\x00g\x00s\x00.
\x00\r\x00\n\x00\xe0\x00\xe1\x00\xe2\x00\xe3\x00\xe4\x00\xe5\x00\r\x00\n\x00'
guessed encoding: utf-16
1 u'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs.\r\n'
1 u'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs.'
2 u'\xe0\xe1\xe2\xe3\xe4\xe5\r\n'
2 u'\xe0\xe1\xe2\xe3\xe4\xe5'

('t1-ucb.txt', '')
raw: '\xfe\xff\x00T\x00h\x00e\x00 \x00q\x00u\x00i\x00c\x00k\x00 \x00b\x00r\x00o\
x00w\x00n\x00 \x00f\x00o\x00x\x00 \x00j\x00u\x00m\x00p\x00e\x00d\x00 \x00o\x00v\
x00e\x00r\x00 \x00t\x00h\x00e\x00 \x00l\x00a\x00z\x00y\x00 \x00d\x00o\x00g\x00s\
x00.\x00\r\x00\n\x00\xe0\x00\xe1\x00\xe2\x00\xe3\x00\xe4\x00\xe5\x00\r\x00\n'
guessed encoding: utf-16
1 u'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs.\r\n'
1 u'The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dogs.'
2 u'\xe0\xe1\xe2\xe3\xe4\xe5\r\n'
2 u'\xe0\xe1\xe2\xe3\xe4\xe5'

Things to be aware of:

(1) "mbcs" is a file-system pseudo-encoding which has no relevance at all to decoding the contents of files. On a system where the default encoding is cp1252, it makes like latin1 (aarrgghh!!); see below

>>> all_bytes = "".join(map(chr, range(256)))
>>> u1 = all_bytes.decode('cp1252', 'replace')
>>> u2 = all_bytes.decode('mbcs', 'replace')
>>> u1 == u2
False
>>> [(i, u1[i], u2[i]) for i in xrange(256) if u1[i] != u2[i]]
[(129, u'\ufffd', u'\x81'), (141, u'\ufffd', u'\x8d'), (143, u'\ufffd', u'\x8f')
, (144, u'\ufffd', u'\x90'), (157, u'\ufffd', u'\x9d')]
>>>

(2) chardet is very good at detecting encodings based on non-Latin scripts (Chinese/Japanese/Korean, Cyrillic, Hebrew, Greek) but not much good at Latin-based encodings (Western/Central/Eastern Europe, Turkish, Vietnamese) and doesn't grok Arabic at all.

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